Good Eats At Rocco Vino’s

Way back in January, before we managed to hit “PEAK STUPID” every day with the China Wuhan Virus , we had an “out of towner” that we had to entertain for a few days and the good  best part of that was we got to expense a pretty good dinner.

Rocco Vino’s

There were six off us and we ordered three appetizers:

Bruschetta, Calamari, Toasted Ravioli.

All very good !!

Roco_001

For my main course, it was a coin toss between the Linguine & Clams or the Zuppa.

I went with the Zuppa.

Zuppa di Pesce….$26
“Scallops, calamari, shrimp, octopus, mussels &
clams with linguine in a tomato herb sauce”

Roco_002

Man, that was really good !!!

When I ordered it, the waitress asked if I wanted it with “red sauce or white sauce” and as soon as she finished saying that she said, “Honey, nobody orders the white sauce.”

Hmmmm, I really thought about the white sauce, which would have been interesting if it were an Alfredo, but not sure if I would want it if it were a white wine sauce.  So I got the red.

I had a dish very similar to the above before.  Similar but not the same:

Acquaviva Winery

I remember the Zupp di Mare was really good but it was so long ago that I wouldn’t be able to say which dinner was better.

Using search engines on the intertubes, I can’t find any difference between Zuppa di Mare and Zuppa di Pesce.  It might just be a personal or regional difference.

Stuxnet in the news again.

http://www.npr.org/2011/09/26/140789306/security-expert-u-s-leading-force-behind-stuxnet?ft=1&f=1001

Security Expert: U.S. ‘Leading Force’ Behind Stuxnet

One year ago, German cybersecurity expert Ralph Langner announced that he had found a computer worm designed to sabotage a nuclear facility in Iran. It’s called Stuxnet, and it was the most sophisticated worm Langner had ever seen.

In the year since, Stuxnet has been analyzed as a cyber-superweapon, one so dangerous it might even harm those who created it.

In the summer of 2010, Langner and his partners went to work analyzing a malicious software program that was turning up in some equipment. Langner Communications is a small firm in Hamburg, Germany, but Langner and the two engineers with whom he works know a lot about industrial control systems. What they found in Stuxnet left them flabbergasted.

“I’m in this business for 20 years, and what we saw in the lab when analyzing Stuxnet was far beyond everything we had ever imagined,” Langner says.

It was a worm that could burrow its way into an industrial control system, the kind of system used in power plants, refineries and nuclear stations. Amazingly, it ignored everything it found except the one piece of equipment it was seeking; when the worm reached its target, it would destroy it.

Several months ago there was an outstanding article detailing the work that went into the investigation to break down Stuxnet.  At any time, they could have stopped their project because it wasn’t a threat to any of their clients, but they continued and it was amazing !!!