Ssssssssshhhhhh !!!!!

GREAT, GREAT, GREAT video below about suppressors and the stupidity of Congress !!

From the video below and a few of my own thoughts:

There is exactly zero reasons every legal gun owner shouldn’t be able to have a suppressor.  A suppressor does not make a gun more dangerous or lethal.

One of the biggest problems with getting suppressors legal and available for everyone, is grandiose ignorance and Hollywood.  Hollywood shows suppressors making guns whisper quiet.  Nope, doesn’t do that.  Grandiose ignorance, most Congressmen know jack doodily squat about guns and accessories (and yet they make laws!!!!)

Please, please, please watch the below video !!!

Advertisements

Big Shout Out To Beretta

I have had my Beretta M9 22 LR for three years.

It’s virtually identical to the M9, but chambered in 22 LR.

This is a fantastic gun to shoot !!

BUT !!!!

A couple of months ago, this happened:

m9_22

The thumb safety sheared off.

DAMN !!!

I contacted Beretta and was able to ship it back to them and they fixed it for free and they also replaced the firing pin as well !!

WOOOOOO!!!!!

Because I am a compulsive tracker of things, I’ve put at least 10,000 rounds through this gun.  I really don’t know what the life expectancy of the firing pin should be, but I know that I didn’t dry fire it or abuse it.

I shot a lot of 22 LR rifle growing up on the farm, but stopped shooting when I left the farm.  My brother is a big elk/turkey hunter (Mostly bow but some black powder for elk/deer) and he started arming up a few years ago when he was woke up at 3:00 am by a couple of county sheriffs chasing a violent felon and they wanted to search his out buildings.  That made him start thinking that he needed some 9mm home protection.  Plus, living way out in the country, we built a little range in his back yard.

Range

Lots of brass flies there !!!!

I got my conceal carry in 05/2018 and the M9 under certain circumstances could be a carry gun, but not for an EDC.

When I bought the M9, because it was such an incredible gun to shoot, I never had any intention of getting another gun, but I needed one for an EDC.  I went out and bought a S&W Compact 22 LR.  Yes, I carried a 22 LR for a year as my carry gun.  I never felt like I was underpowered.  Not tooting my own horn, but I shoot my 22’s lights out and I would like to think that if the SHTF, my rounds would be on target and quite frankly, that’s the most important part of a self defense shooting.

However , after a year, I did get another gun, this time it was the S&W 380 Shield EZ.

https://bacontime.wordpress.com/2019/06/06/smith-wesson-380-ez/

Again, a big shout out to Beretta for taking car of my gun !!

 

 

 

 

“The Search For An Effective Police Handgun”

“The Search For An Effective Police Handgun”

by Allen P. Bristow 1973

I recently found the above book in our library at work and took it home to read.

A very interesting read because it was written in 1973 and we already know the history since the book was written.

From the 1930’s to 1960’s the standard police weapon was the .38 Special.

“During 1959, Police Science students at Los Angeles State College began collecting case studies of peace officers shot in the line of duty.  To date over 110 cases have been collected which describe in detail the shooting of more that 150 officers”

For the sake of brevity, just one case:

Officer “A” and Officer “B” approached two suspects in a parked car.  The suspects were removed from the car for investigation.  One suspect drew a 9 mm automatic from a hidden holster and commanded the officers to throw up their hands, which they did.  Both officers attempted to reason with the suspect, and failing to do this, they leaped at the suspect in an attempt to disarm him.  The suspect fired once, fatally wounding Officer “B” through the chest.  Officer “A” grasped the suspect’s pistol in one hand and held it down while drawing his own service revolver with his free hand.  Officer “A” then fired five .38 S&W Special rounds at contact distance into the chest area of the struggling suspect.  The suspect fell to the ground still clutching the 9 mm pistol.  Officer “A” turned to assist Officer “B.”  The suspect attempted to regain his feet and point his pistol at Officer “A”.  Officer “A” dropped his empty service revolver and lunged for the revolver on the belt of “Officer “B.”  With this weapon he shot the suspect through the head, killing him instantly.  Autopsy revealed that none of the five .38 S&W Special shots fired into the suspects body exited.  Several ribs were broken, both lungs penetrated, and there was extensive internal bleeding.  Note that although the wounds were serious, the shocking effect was not sufficient to prevent the suspect from regaining his feet and attempting to shoot the second officer.

The above case is very similar to most of the cases that were in the book in that a suspect could have multiple hits, including to the chest, and continue to stay in the fight and that the suspect was finally killed with a head shot.

The author then goes on about the history of the .38 Special and it’s known deficiencies.  It was a military sidearm that was demonstrated to not being effective during the Philippine operations 1899-1900.  From that, the American military quickly replaced the .38 Long Colt with the .45.

During the 1930’s, the .357 magnum was developed and the .44 magnum in the 1950’s for specifically man-stopping power.  However, there was far more recoil from the larger calibers and there was concern about over penetration and greater range and civilian safety.

It’s hard to believe, but police departments held themselves to the standard of the Geneva Convention with regards to using more effective ammunition (please, no pedantic arguments over this point).  It was known for sometime (the 1890’s and Dum Dum bullets) that other than ball type ammo was very,very effective for stopping a man.  When police departments decided to start using hollow points and jacketed ammunition, there was a lot of opposition from citizen groups where as today, we take it for granted that anyone and everyone uses hollow points to deliberately do maximum damage.

But it really wasn’t until the mid 1960’s that a better service round was produced.  Super Vel   110 grained jacketed hollow point vs the 158 grained round nosed.  It had more velocity and less recoil and did far more damage.  That was the first major step up in police weaponry in almost 30 years !

The next step up was around 1963 when the .41 magnum was introduced.  Bigger than the .357, smaller than the .44, it was thought to be the wave of the future.  Some departments jumped on this revolver quickly but while it had less recoil than the .44 magnum, it had more recoil than the .38 Special.

Next came the .45:

On February 2, 1966, the El Monte Police Department in El Monte, California, broke American law enforcement tradition dating back to the early 1900’s by adopting the Colt .45 cal. automatic as its service weapon, displacing as inadequate the .38 Special revolver.

The .45 cal ACP with the 230 grain jacketed round has about 1000 ft lbs of muzzle energy and only about 800 ft/sec muzzle velocity.  This made it a good choice for hard hitting, but less chance for over penetration.

This is about where the author ends, except noting that the Illinois State Police was the first department to adopt the 9 mm S & W Model 39 for its official weapon.

The history and evolution of this is very interesting. Almost everyone and almost every police department has 9 mm and some people may just take it for granted that it’s always been that way !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smith & Wesson 380 EZ

I’ve had my conceal carry now for just over a year.  For the past year, my EDC was a S&W Compact 22 LR. Lots and lots of reasons for a 22 LR.  First, cheap ammo.  I am currently paying 4.3 cents a round and that is considerably less than any other caliber which means for the same money, I can shoot 6-8 times more.  That is a very important factor in that since I shoot almost weekly, I am a gosh darn good shot.  No, I will never be a marksman, sniper, trick shot artist or shoot dime sized groups on paper, but I will be able to put multiple rounds in the vital areas of a human.  Second, and this relates to the last statement made, low recoil.  “Putting rounds on target!!!”  For a lot less money, I can practice my sight alignment and trigger pulls.

I was perfectly confident in carrying my 22 LR every day but for some reason, I went and purchased a larger caliber gun.

The Smith & Wesson EZ 380.

S_W_380_EZ.gif

It’s made with the S&W compact frame style so it’s almost identical in feel as the Compact 22 LR.  Instead of having a magazine safety, it has a grip safety.  I like that feature because I take my gun into the gym I go to and like that it’s not likely to go off spontaneously in my gym bag.   Also like the Compact 22 LR, it has a thumb safety.  I WILL NOT OWN A GUN WITHOUT A THUMB SAFETY.  Yeah I know I’m the odd man with that as most shooters are the exact opposite.

I checked out a lot of online reviews and watched a lot of Youtube videos about the 380 EZ.

Most of them went like this:

“It’s a great gun, FOR YOUR MOTHER.”

“It’s a great gun, FOR YOUR SISTER.”

“It’s a great gun, FOR YOUR GRANDMOTHER.”

“It’s a great gun, IF YOU ARE A PUSSY AND CAN’T CARRY A .45.”

 

S_W_380

The 380 EZ holds 8+1 and above is my second time shooting it.  The first time it shot way left and by GOD the allen screw that holds the rear sight for adjustment was soooooooo tight I had to use pliers on the allen wrench to loosen it !!  But, it’s now adjusted and sighted in.  The right target was at 7 yards and the left target was at 5 yards with double tapping (4 1/2 inch circles).  So far, I am very satisfied with this gun.  Like I said earlier, my goal is not to shoot dime sized groups on paper, but to be able to hit a man sized target.

I don’t plan on shooting this gun a lot, I think I can keep shooting the Compact 22 as my primary practice gun and shoot a couple of mags a week of the 380 to keep it in tune.

A Walk In The Woods

 

This is a post continuing the “Park” series:

Sorry, Park’s Closed

Weekend At The Park

Another Day In The Park

Sunday In The Park

My dad still lives in the house (for now) that my great grandfather bought about 1890.  Separate from that house property is a small piece of land that is wooded about a mile away.  It was fairly common back then to have a plot of woods for firewood, lumber and  hunting.

Woods 1

The red square is my dad’s land, and the yellow, is the pathway.  One of the downsides is that there is no direct access from the county road.  We have been using that pathway since about 1890.  Now, about five years ago, the $@#!^$@ jackasses that were leasing the land that had the pathway on it put up a gate at the county road entrance and locked it.  They also plowed up most of the pathway and were preventing access to my dad’s land.  About $5000 later in court, we had access to the pathway legally back. (Access Easement).

We used to go out to “the woods” when were kids with my dad to get firewood or dig up a tree to replant, but I hadn’t been out there for probably 25 years.  My brother on the other hand deer hunts out there every year.  Since the little piece of woods in yellow, just next to the red square, is not our property, it is not maintained by the %#@*!&@$ jackasses.  It’s not a long walk to park off the county road and walk in, but the path in through the little piece of woods was not passable.  (The court order also prohibited us from parking on the ^$$@*#^ jackass property.)

Soooooooooooooooooooo, I can stand at a firing line at the range or at my brother’s ALL-DAY-LONG, but I want to take my skills up a notch.  I wanted to set up a shooting course in the woods. (Plus it would be just dang fun!!).  Since I wanted something, I would have to do the work to get it.

This video is the “Before” shot.

I had shorts on so I did not go in too far for fear of any of about 30 plants that would result in me being very itchy.

Now, I planned on shooting the same day and brought my IView glasses and GoPro for filming, and I was planning on documenting myself working.  Well, once again I greatly overestimated my ability to do manual labor.  The work itself was not really that hard, but since it had rained the night before and the woods were so dense that no wind blew through, it was like being in a tropical rain forest.  Added to that I was wearing a hoodie with the hood up to keep the mosquito’s off.  While the mosquito’s were not a problem  I left the hoodie on just so I wouldn’t waste time swatting bugs while I was working.  After about 30 minutes, I was literally soaking wet.  I finished after about three hours of work and was in absolutely no condition to do any shooting !

The above video was the “After” shot of me driving in the next day

This is the drive from the county road to the woods:

 

I drive a small crossover and is not really made for four wheeling.  But as long as it’s dry, it should be OK to get in.  This video was the day after I cleared the path.  The video is at 2X speed to make it a little less boring.

I hauled in a weed wacker and chainsaw to do the work.

Just waiting for the next weekend to get out to the woods again !!

 

Chicago Tribune/Conceal Carry Article

Before getting into the Tribune story, I will tell my story.

I recently received my CCL in Illinois.

The two first things:

  • It was embarrassingly simple
  • Based on #1, it is amazing to me that I have not heard more about criminal incidents with CCL holders.

Going back to #1.  The class is 16 hours long including about 2 hours of range time. To qualify for the shooting, you figuratively have to hit the side of a barn 21 times from 5,7,10 yards (10 shots each) and there is no written test to demonstrate that you have knowledge of the law.

I have had my CCL for about two weeks and I have only taken my gun out with me 4-5 times.  I am not completely comfortable with my holster (have ordered a much better one) and quite frankly, if I am not completely comfortable, I won’t be carrying.  The gun I have chosen has a manual safety on it (both my guns have a manual safety) and for now I have a full magazine in the gun but an empty chamber.  Walking around in public with a weapon is a very strange thing and for now, I am being extra careful.  I also need to buy a lock box for my car.

Now, On to the Chicago Tribune story:

Almost nothing is known about dozens of concealed carry shootings in Illinois. Why?

(If the above link is broken, CLICK HERE)

The state police know nothing about the nearly 40 shootings by people with concealed carry licenses since Illinois became the last state to allow them four years ago.

A Tribune review found that most of the shootings have been in public places in the Chicago area, and half the cases have involved concealed carry holders firing to defend themselves or someone else from robbers. At least 11 people have been killed, including a man with a license who tried to fend off carjackers on the West Side.

The state police have not collected any information that might improve the training of license holders and possibly better protect them and the public — a reform suggested by police and gun instructors interviewed by the Tribune.

“That’s not our role,” explained Jessica Trame, chief of the Firearms Services Bureau for the state police. “We have to abide by the concealed carry act. … We issue cards; we revoke those cards from those who are prohibited from having them. And if they are not prohibited, there’s no other action on our side.”

“That’s not our role.”

The state police do not even keep a list of shootings by concealed carry holders.

“That’s not our role.”

Very simple, the CCL law does not require the State Police to track CCL involved shootings

The Tribune combed through police files, court records and news reports to compile its own list. The analysis shows that:

  • Most of those shot by CCL holders have been armed robbers. Others include carjackers, a burglar with a crowbar, a robber with a gun to a clerk’s head, neighbors, an ex-girlfriend, a father-in-law, an unarmed teen stealing a Jeep, a passenger in a car during a road rage attack and a naked man acting “aggressively.”

  • They were shot by homeowners, customers, security guards, store clerks, a Chicago police dispatcher, a Chicago fire lieutenant, a Chicago Park District worker, a tow-truck driver and the owner of a West Side cellphone store.

  • The shootings took place at currency exchanges, phone stores, a driveway between two homes, parking lots, a party, a Loop McDonald’s, a West Side church, a block where children played and a downstate gun range.

So the shootings took place in a variety of locations just like other shootings by a general assortment of people.  Not sure why “children” had to be specifically mentioned. Children are all over the place.

 

Lt. Matthew Boerwinkle, a spokesman for the state police, believes problems with concealed carry holders are few and there is no need for more oversight or transparency.

“You rarely hear of an instance where a CCL holder is using their firearm in an unlawful manner,” he said. “They’re generally law-abiding citizens, and they’ve gone to great lengths to get to where they’re at to have a CCL. And they’ve taken training to get there. And most of them, they understand what the requirements are to use force to defend themselves.”

But the state police cannot support those conclusions because they do not have any data on whether CCL holders have been adequately trained for the situations they have met.

“Cannot support those conclusions..”

Yes they can.

About 40 documented shootings involving a CCL holder in 5 years and there are almost 265,000 CCL holders.

In Illinois, more than 265,000 people have licenses, about 2 percent of the adult population. The law prohibits the release of any information more specific than how many CCL holders are in each ZIP code.

“We need the information to evaluate whether the system is working,” said Kristen Rand, the center’s legislative director. “The statutes were put in place with the idea that they’re going to make the public safer. We should measure whether that’s actually the case.”

 

 

Again, only 40 documented incidents out of 265,00??  Not too bad.

 

To get a license, you must be at least 21 and have a valid firearm owners identification card. You can’t have been convicted of physical violence in the last five years, or had more than two DUIs in the past five years or have any outstanding arrest warrants.

An arrest with charges later dropped does not disqualify you. Fingerprints are not required.

You also must undergo 16 hours of training — usually a weekend — and have hit 21 of 30 targets at close range. To renew a license, required every five years, a person must take a refresher course that covers gun skills.

Few shootings were reported in the first years after the state began issuing licenses in January 2014. Two the first year, three the second year and six in 2016, according to a Tribune review.

But last year the number ballooned to at least 19, most of them in Chicago. In December, there were four shootings in the city in just 10 days, two in one day, according to police reports.

So far this year, there have been at least eight shootings involving CCL holders. Three were reported in a single week in March.

It’s not clear what’s behind the increase, but it may be that people are becoming more comfortable carrying and using guns in public.

BALLOONED TO 18 !!!

Again, 40 in 5 years.

In Illinois, many CCL holders told officers they feared for their lives or others’, but the police reports also document guns drawn in anger. In only a handful of cases have prosecutors filed charges, all of them last year.

  • Last fall, Robert E. Witt, 37, was arrested at his job at a downstate truck stop with a loaded gun on his hip. He was accused of firing the gun months earlier at his wife and was charged with reckless discharge of a firearm. No one was hit, though a crime scene photo showed the bullet exited the home directly over a pink children’s ride-on toy. Witt told officers he had “seen green in his head, which to him means that it’s safe to take the shot,” according to an investigator. Bloomington police filled out a clear and present danger form and seized Witt’s concealed carry license.
  • On an 80-degree summer day, Keli McGrath, a Chicago police dispatcher in her late 40s, became embroiled in a road rage incident with an 18-year-old mother of two who was in a car with her kids and her 12-year-old brother. The teen threw soda on McGrath from an open window, and the two women pulled over in a parking lot on Ashland Avenue in Bridgeport. The teen grabbed McGrath by her hair and shoved her. McGrath pulled a 9 mm from her leather holster and shot the teen in the chest. The teen was taken to a hospital in critical condition. McGrath was charged with aggravated battery.
  • Early one morning last September, Lyft driver Jaleesa Rance picked up two men from the Sidetrack nightclub in Lakeview. They started arguing when one of the men said she had taken a wrong turn, according to police. Rance stopped her car, pulled a Smith and Wesson handgun from the center console and told them to “get out of my (expletive) car.” As they left, she yelled a gay slur and said, “I’ll blast you.” She was charged with aggravated assault and unlawful use of a weapon, but was acquitted. Lyft later made clear their drivers are not to have weapons in their cars.
  • Several others have been charged with reckless discharge of a weapon or reckless conduct: a man shooting at “gangbangers” no one else saw, another man shooting into his kitchen floor, a homeowner firing into the air during a party and a judge in DuPage County pulling the trigger of what he thought was a empty gun, sending a bullet through a neighbor’s wall.

The rest of the cases reviewed by the Tribune were found by investigators to be justifiable self-defense.

7.

Seven out of 40.

40 in 5 years.

And also, no injuries in the above examples.  Doesn’t change the fact that those people did wrong with their guns.

The Cook County state’s attorney’s office, which has handled most of the CCL shootings in the state, would not elaborate. “We don’t discuss charging decisions,” spokesman Robert Foley said.

He would not say if there were any cases where police disagreed with prosecutors.

Of the cases cleared by prosecutors, the Oak Park shooting best illustrates how a legal shooting can still pose a threat to public safety.

About 11:15 a.m. on May 27, a 24-year-old man parked around the corner from the U.S. Bank branch at 11 Madison St. and withdrew $260 from the ATM. What happened next is detailed in a stack of witness statements and forensics reports:

The man got back into his Buick Regal as a black BMW tore out of the bank lot, sped down the alley and cut him off. Damon Phillips, 16, jumped out wearing a mask and holding a gun in his hand. The man grabbed his own gun from the center console, and the two fired at each other.

Phillips was hit several times and fell to the ground. The man ran across the parking lot and fired over his shoulder. A couple in a car ducked under the dashboard, a man from Wisconsin hid behind a telephone pole and yelled “Get down!” to a woman driving into the line of fire.

One of the investigators in the case agreed with prosecutors that the shooting was justified, but he felt there were things the CCL holder could have done differently to minimize the risk to himself and others.

After firing at the armed robber, the CCL holder told detectives he took off running across the bank parking lot but heard gunfire behind him. So he shot over his shoulder into the air.

“He felt that might make the others stop shooting at him while not putting innocent people in harm’s way,” the investigator said, asking that he not be named. “Me, I would’ve tried to get cover behind a parked car and return fire from a crouched position.”

Police reports indicate no one went over this point with the CCL holder, and nothing was reported to the state police.

“He felt that might make the others stop shooting at him while not putting innocent people in harm’s way,” the investigator said, asking that he not be named. “Me, I would’ve tried to get cover behind a parked car and return fire from a crouched position.”

Police reports indicate no one went over this point with the CCL holder, and nothing was reported to the state police.

???????

What difference does it make if the police didn’t discuss second guessing what the Victim should have done???

It’s my personal opinion that I believe that the CCL holder should have been charged based on “shooting over his shoulder into the air.”  But, since there were no injuries, I suspect he was not charged because it would be likely that a jury could find him not guilty based on having just been in an armed robbery.  Tough call for prosecution.

 

The Oak Park investigator believes one way to make CCL holders better and safer is to require 40 hours of training, more than twice what is required now. Those extra hours would include more situational training.

“I tell people you need to be ready all the time,” he said. “Every minute you need to be ready, thinking about how you would react if this or this or this happened, in case something pops off. It’s running scenarios through your mind every time you’re out.”

Instructors who have taught classes in Illinois the last four years say the same thing. Generally, they argue for more hours, more live-fire training and more one-on-one basics at the gun range.

Some instructors were troubled by people who appeared eager to shoot at someone, raising questions whether the screening process is strenuous enough.

More training??

I cannot disagree with that.

People appearing eager to shoot someone reflects on the screening process ????

Does anyone think there should be an “interview” added to the process ??

“I think it’s great that people can defend themselves and it can be good for crime prevention,” said Sara Ahrens, who was in the U.S. Army and stayed on as a reservist when she began working as a Rockford police officer before retiring in 2014. “But I’m not sure the average concealed carry person thinks it through how that situation is going to unfold.”

She speaks from experience.

Ahrens was on the force less than two years when she fatally shot a man who came at her with a knife. Months later, a woman raced at her with a butcher knife, but dropped it seconds before Ahrens had to decide whether to pull the trigger.

“Even as close as she was, I still felt like, at that time, I might miss,” Ahrens said. “It’s a life-or-death situation and you don’t want to make a mistake on that.”

She believes applicants should go through scenarios where they must make tough choices. For example, an applicant should have to pull their weapon and see how long it takes to get a shot off.

Ahrens also favors the state police reviewing shootings with CCL holders and requiring more training when needed.

She noted that police officers, who undergo hundreds of hours of training — including exercises on when and when not to shoot — routinely undergo reviews by independent agencies whenever they use their gun. She doesn’t see why the same routine shouldn’t apply to concealed carry holders.

Sorry I had to put that whole block quote there  but I had to get to the last part about police training vs civilian training.

Seriously??

Comparing apples to asteroids.

Police officers might be in a situation every day.  Considering there have been only 40 documented incidents involving CCL holders, it does not appear that CCL holders are constantly in life threatening situations. The police have far more legal oblagations and resposibilities.

Valinda Rowe with IllinoisCarry, a supporter of the right to carry guns, worries that more restrictions or oversight could leave people with less protection.

“These are real hardships for the people in the city’s poorest neighborhoods, which happen to be the highest in crime,” she said. “The people who, I feel, are most in need of a concealed carry license are the ones who have to find the resources to pay for all the training and the license and then travel outside (Chicago) city limits to practice shooting their weapon.”

This is a valid concern.

If left to the anti gun crowd, they would have tried to make the process as onerous as the original Chicago ban to discourage applicants.

 

Groups like IllinoisCarry and the National Rifle Association give low marks to the state’s concealed carry law. They often cite the fact that Illinois had to be ordered to pass the law by the federal courts after every other state had done so.

I contacted Valina Rowe, spokesperson for IllinoisCarry, and she did confirm that they give the Illinois conceal law low marks, but because of the restrictiveness of the law, not because of the general point of this article, lack of state police supervision.

 

Last year, the magazine Guns & Ammo ranked Illinois as one of the worst states for gun laws (40th), citing the “extensive training required.” It liked Arizona best because the governor had just signed a bill preventing local governments from enacting background checks.

????

I checked the 2017 rating by Guns & Ammo, and I did not see “extensive training required” listed in the Illinois ranking.

http://www.gunsandammo.com/second-amendment/best-states-for-gun-owners-2017/

40th

Illinois gets a bad rap among gun owners thanks to its largest city but the rest of the state’s gun laws aren’t as restrictive as many would assume.  Guns & Ammo’s offices are located in Peoria, in the state’s center.  Illinois became the last state in the nation to implement a concealed carry statue in 2013, subject to a court order.  There is no reciprocity but non-resident permits are available.  Outside of Chicago and a few of its suburbs, black rifles and magazines are unrestricted.  The state’s legislature nearly passed a bill this session that would have placed onerous requirements on gun dealers so it’s not all peaches and cream.  Illinois is pretty-much a no go when it comes to NFA items—only two points are awarded in that category.  A $10 state police-issued FOID (Firearm Owner’s Identification) card is required to purchase or possess a firearm in the state.

 

As in dozens of other states, Illinois will not say who applied for a license, who got them, who didn’t and why. Some police departments will say whether a person involved in a shooting has a FOID card or a concealed carry license. But if they don’t, it’s impossible to find out from state police.

NO WAY, NO HOW SHOULD THE LIST OF CCL HOLDERS BE MADE PUBLIC !

Not only would that make it easy for criminals to find gunless victims, there would be a high probability of left wing gun haters doing all they could to harass the CCL holders.

The agency also will not disclose why nearly 3,400 people have had their concealed carry licenses revoked or suspended. The reasons could range from the license simply expiring to a person carrying a gun while drunk.

“It’s not their role”

Easy enough.

It’s also the law working the way it should. (Taking the CCL from those who violate the law)

It is similarly secretive about objections that can be filed by local law enforcement when there are concerns about an applicant’s criminal history or mental health.

Objections are often overruled, and the state police will not publicly release any information on why.

“It’s not their role” and it’s none of your business.

Many law enforcement agencies don’t even file objections. The state police did not get a single objection from about 40 percent of the state’s 102 counties. Most of the other 60 or so counties have filed fewer than five objections over four years.

“I don’t think I ever have put a (objection) letter on anyone,” said Darby Boewe, the sheriff of Edwards County in southeast Illinois. “I’ve taught a lot of the people here who’ve got their permit. Believe me, if I had one sticking out as unqualified or mentally unfit, I’d be reporting them.”

“Few objections, Sheriff Darby said if he knew of an unfit applicant, he’d object.”

That’s how the system works.

Also very important to note that in order to qualify for an Illinois CCL, one must have a valid FOID card.  The state police have already vetted the FOID applicant so that is the general reason for few objections.

Boewe said he depends on CCL holders to fill the gaps as state police patrols have been cut back.

“I’ve told these people, ‘You may be my backup if I get pinned in,’ and they understand that and they take it serious,” Boewe said. “I’ve never had the first complaint about someone trying to act like a cop and, you believe me, we’re clear with them that they better not get to acting above the law.”

Not really sure if the Sheriff is suggesting that he expects CCL citizens to be involved with police activity??

Not acting above the law?

99% of people already act within the law with or without a CCL.

 

The situation is markedly different in Cook County, where last year the sheriff’s office filed more than 1,050 objections. So far, 394 of the applications have been approved and the office has yet to hear about more than 600 others.

Cara Smith, chief policy officer for Sheriff Tom Dart, was clearly frustrated at the large number of permits issued over the office’s objections. Reviewing applications, and in many cases filing objections in vain, “detracts resources from our ability to combat gun violence in the city or to our other police work we’re doing.”

1,050 objections in Cook County.

Shocking !!

Considering the population of Cook County, the amount of crime in Cook County and the fact that Cook County has 74,000 CCL holders.  Also a high probability that some of those objections may even be political or personal.

One case in particular underlines that frustration.

The office had filed an objection against a man whose profile photos on Facebook showed him flashing what appeared to be gang signs. In one of the photos, he had a gun tucked in the waistband of his jeans as he sat on the hood of a car.

The seven-person state review board issued him a CCL anyway. In 2015, one of his weapons was taken away after an arrest for theft. Court records show he asked for the gun back — and his request was granted.

“Facebook photos of the applicant flashing gang signs and having a gun in his waistband.”

Neither of those are criminal activities. Neither of those disqualify him as an applicant.

A week before Christmas last year, he drove to the parking lot at a McKinley Park Target store and met Jermaine Marshall, 21, who had arrived by Lyft, according to the police report.

Marshall walked up to the CCL holder’s car and the Lyft driver heard shots. The holder sped off, leaving Marshall dead on the pavement, police said. Officers caught up with the CCL holder, who told police he had intended to return to the scene.

He said he was the victim of a robbery and has not been charged, though police say he remains under investigation. The state police have not been notified, and so there is nothing in their records about the shooting if the man chooses to renew his license.

Is this guy a gangbanger and had a deal go bad?

Who knows.

The state police have not been notified?

“It’s not their role.”

If he gets convicted of a gun, well, then there’s an actionable issue.

 

 

Over all, I was quite surprised  with the general tone of this article in the formerly great Chicago Tribune.  Also considering it was a front page story on a Sunday edition.

I am actually going to agree with some of the general premise of the article.

I do think that the CCL class should be more difficult with at least a written test to document the fact that the applicant has knowledge of the carry laws.

There should be role playing situations.

I say that because I do take my CCL very serious and I would want every CCL holder to be as serious as I am for the sake of all of us.

 

M9 22 lr From the Double Action Position

I stopped at Shoot Point Blank on my way home from work Saturday.

I’m never going to claim to be a marksman or a sharpshooter, but feel I am at least competent with handling my weapon.

Shoot_point_blank_001

You will notice that there is a great difference between the top two 4 inch targets and the bottom three 2 inch targets.  All shot at 7 yards.

If you shoot just to shoot, there is nothing wrong about that.  But if you are training to possibly be in a defensive shooting situation, you should practice shooting from the double action position. (if your weapon has double action).  My M9 22 is a double/single.

I am going to get a CCW in my state soon and I do need to practice such things.  I doubt that my M9 would be a daily carry piece just because of the size, but I do like the da/sa as a safety control.

The 4 inch on the right was the first magazine and the left was the second.  I did much better with the second mag.